South Carolina State Tinting Laws

The Palmetto State is one of the more strictly regulated parts of the south when it comes to window tinting, so it’s important for consumers to be informed about the laws involved before seeking window tint for their vehicles. That being said, you can still enjoy all of the benefits of tinted windows as long as you adhere to the simple guidelines below.

  • Front Sides: 27.5%
  • Rear Sides: 27.5%
  • Back Window: 27.5%
  • Front Visor: 4″

 

You are allowed to tint all of the side and rear windows on your automobile and can even apply a strip across of your windshield that is up to 4 inches wide. However, there are a few stipulations regarding what type of film can be used.

Film laid on the front two windows of your car, truck van or SUV must allow at least 27.5% of light to pas through the window and ANY tint darkness is allowed on the back window and two rear windows. Naturally, this ensures that the driver has maximum visibility when navigating through traffic. Film on the rear side windows or back windshield can be as dark as you want, meaning you are allowed to have the ultra dark “limo tint” film on these windows if you’d like.

South Carolina prohibits window film from being any more reflective than a normal, untinted window. So, some special types of reflective metallic films are not allowed.

One recommendation we make to our customers to compensate for the tighter rules and still get the heat protection and high profile look many of them desire is to upgrade to a premium film. Premium gloss films can block more heat, last longer and have a slightly classier appearance than cheaper basic films without using prohibited metallic materials or super dark coloration. Call today to speak with one of our experienced representatives to find out what the best tint package for your car will be.

South Carolina Window Tint Law

These are the current South Carolina Window Tint Laws.

South Carolina Window Tint Law Enacted: 1992

We have made every effort to provide you with accurate and up to date information regarding South Carolina window tint law. Please refer to you local authority for current South Carolina window tint law enforcement policies, including rules and regulations, as the final authority on South Carolina window tint law in your area.

SOUTH CAROLINA WINDOW TINT LAW ALLOWS THE FOLLOWING DARKNESS FOR CAR WINDOW TINTING

The darkness of tint is measured by (VLT%) Visible Light Transmission percentage. In South Carolina window tint law, this percentage refers to percentage of visible light allowed to pass through the combination of film and the factory tint of the window.

Here is what is allowed in South Carolina window tint law:
Windshield Non-reflective tint is allowed along the top of the windshield above the manufacturer’s AS-1 line.
Front Side Windows Must allow more than a total of 27% light in. Transmission through glass.
Back Side Windows Must allow more than a total of 27% light in. Transmission through glass.
Rear Window Must allow more than a total of 27% light in. Transmission through glass.

HOW REFLECTIVE CAN THE TINT BE ON AUTO WINDOWS ACCORDING TO SOUTH CAROLINA WINDOW TINT LAW?

Tinting film can contain metallic elements (silver mirror look) that help to reflect incoming light and reject the glare and heat generated by visible light.

Front Side Windows Must be non-reflective.
Back Side Windows Must be non-reflective.

OTHER SOUTH CAROLINA RULES AND REGULATIONS

Restricted Colors The tint colors of RED AMBER YELLOW are not allowed by state law.
Side Mirrors Dual side mirrors are required if back window is tinted.
Certificate Requirements Manufacturers of film need to certify the film they sell in the state. Ask your dealer if they are using certified film.
Sticker Requirements The sticker to identify legal tinting is required between the film and glass on each tinted window.
Medical Exemption South Carolina window tint law allows medical exemptions for special tint. For more details about the specific terms of the exemption for window tinting, consult your state law.